Pinehurst 2014 U.S. Opens Archive

Excerpt from “Slaying the Tiger” – The 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst

Editor’s Note: The following is an excerpt from Shane Ryan’s new book, “Slaying the Tiger: A Year Inside the Ropes of the New PGA Tour.”  Ryan dives into the 2014 U.S. Open on Pinehurst No. 2, the USGA, some of the – ahem – more interesting thoughts on Coore and Crenshaw’s 2010 restoration of Donald Ross’s masterpiece. You can purchase the book here.

“Charlie Price, the great writer, he’d say Pinehurst in his day was fairways, and the fairways were oases within sandy country. The wispy rye grass, pine needles and sand, the little tufts of ground, that’s what Pinehurst was.” —Ben  Crenshaw,  to, on the restoration of Pinehurst No. 2


In the nine years preceding the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst, the winning score was even par or worse six times. Two of the three winners who actually went under par—Tiger Woods in 2008 and Lucas Glover the next year—stayed nice and close, at -1 and -4, respectively. The only exception came in 2011, when Rory McIlroy put on a historic show at Congressional Country Club, decimating a difficult track to the tune of -16 and asserting himself as one of the world’s best players.

The first winner in that difficult stretch was Michael Campbell, who won at the Pinehurst Resort in the Sandhills of North Carolina with even par in 2005. Campbell has largely been forgotten—he’s a member of golf’s one-hit wonder club, and you can barely find a mention of him at the club—but the previous Pinehurst champion in 1999, Payne Stewart, has become an important part of the resort’s identity. Less than six months after he won the event, he died in a plane crash, and he’s honored today with a large statue outside the clubhouse that captures the moment when he sunk the winning putt on 18 to beat Phil Mickelson—clad in his famous knickers and tam-o’-shanter cap, right foot off the ground, fist extended in triumph. … Continue Reading

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New Pinehurst documentary set to debut Thursday

“Pinehurst’s New Golden Age: No. 2 and the Championships,” a new documentary produced by TenMayflower Productions, will debut at 10 p.m. Thursday on UNC-TV. 

Featuring archival, never-before-seen photography and footage, the documentary traces one of the most significant periods in Pinehurst’s storied championship history, including the transcendent U.S. Open championships in 1999 and 2005.

The hour-long program is also the definitive recap of the 2014 U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open at Pinehurst, the first two major championships to be conducted in consecutive weeks at the same site in the history of golf.

The feature provides unprecedented insight into the magic of Pinehurst through the eyes of historians, journalists, USGA officials, broadcasters, some of the biggest names in golf.

2014 U.S. Open champions Martin Kaymer and Michelle Wie recount their triumphs on Pinehurst No. 2 while such notables as Jack Nicklaus, Ben Crenshaw, Curtis Strange, Michael Campbell and others add a unique perspective into their own successes at Pinehurst.

The documentary also details the 2010 restoration of Donald Ross’s famed championship course. Bill Coore and Crenshaw recall the momentous decision to return No. 2 to its 1940s-era roots in setting the stage for the triumphant 2014 U.S. Opens and a new philosophy in golf course management.

For more information, go to Purchase a DVD of “Pinehurst’s New Golden Age: No. 2 and the Championships” from any of our retail outlets or online at

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Ben Crenshaw ready to say goodbye to Augusta


In April, Ben Crenshaw will play in his final Masters. The two-time champion reflects on a storied relationship


Ben Crenshaw was low amateur in the 1972 and ’73 Masters Tournaments, finishing 19th and 24th, respectively. He played in the annual rite of spring at Augusta National the next 43 years, winning in 1984 and 1995 and notching nine more top 10 finishes. He’s made the cut only two of the last 17 years, though, as the golf course has been consistently stretched out to match the power of today’s athletic swings and the heat generated by modern club technology.

Augusta played 6,905 yards when Crenshaw won in 1984. It played 7,435 yards in 2014, and Crenshaw’s rounds of 83-85 prompted him to say, “Enough.”

The 2015 Masters will be his last. … Continue Reading

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By the numbers: 2014 U.S. Open championships


Like numbers? The USGA has a few to share with you. 

Take a look at some of the notable occurrences and accomplishments from the back-to-back U.S. Open championships held in Pinehurst last June. Thanks to the USGA for sharing

Adobe Photoshop PDF

Pretty interesting, eh? Read more by clicking here.

If you like the USGA’s infographic, check out this one we created using their figures.





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Pinehurst’s Bob Dedman praised by Golf Digest, David Fay

As the golf world continues to reflect on 2014, we at Pinehurst have been overwhelmed by some of the praise that has been directed at Pinehurst No. 2 and the 2014 U.S. Open and U.S. Women’s Open.

We are blessed with great leadership as well, which was recognized again in the January 2015 issue of Golf Digest when David Fay named Pinehurst CEO and Owner Robert Dedman Jr. to the “Super Six in Women’s Golf in 2014.”

Fay, the former executive director of the USGA, wrote of Dedman:

… Continue Reading

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