Pinehurst Heritage Archive

Alberta Travis – In Your Words

It was only a short while ago we posted our story about the incomparable Alberta Travis, who the North Carolina Restaurant and Lodging Association will recognize for her accomplishments when she is honored as the 2016 Front Line Employee of the Year.

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Immediately, there was an outpouring of praise and support from many of you, those who are past guests of Pinehurst, but also from Alberta’s friends, family and co-workers. It is clearly apparent the impact Alberta has made not only on our guests over the years, but for everyone who comes in even a short moment’s contact with her.

Please take a second to read what others have said about one very special person:

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You’re right, Jeff. We are very blessed.

Congratulations, Alberta, from all of us.

*Please feel free to add your congratulations and notes to Alberta in the comments below.

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A Life Lesson from Donald Ross

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Old Tom Morris was against gambling in golf and advised Donald Ross to never bet on the golf course beyond a small wager. “Why make a horse race out of a game like golf?” Morris posited. Ross took Old Tom’s words to heart and for the rest of his life rarely played for stakes beyond a quarter Nassau. Ross said that Calcutta pools “don’t belong in such a fine, clean game.”

Once at Pinehurst, a young man who didn’t know Ross asked him for a game and a $25 Nassau.

“Let’s just play for the fun of the game,” Ross countered.

The young man insisted, so Ross relented, played the visitor and beat him soundly.

“I built the course,” Ross told his opponent. “Let this be a lesson to you: Don’t play for high stakes with a stranger.”

-Lee Pace

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Restoring Pinehurst’s History Hallway

The Golf Channel’s Matt Ginella has always been kind to us. (Thanks, Matt.) And usually, when he discusses the merits of Pinehurst, he never fails to mention at least three things:

  1. The Golf
  2. The Best Breakfast in Golf
  3. The Pinehurst Clubhouse History Hall

Matt typically advises Pinehurst guests to spend as much time as possible in our history hall, to take in the memorabilia in our cases and the photos on the walls.

Over the past few weeks, though, we’ve taken a few minor steps in what we hope will be an improved experience with those photos. With the help of the wonderful Tufts Archives, we’ve restored many of the photos, which had been damaged over time.

Also, we’ve updated the framing and matting, and in what may be our favorite part, added contextual captions with each photo. Most of these captions go into further detail about every photo – you already know the where; here, we add the who, the what and the why. (You can see examples of the work in the video above. Also, a note: Be sure to have the sound up while playing the video. It’s worth it.)

We have a few further plans that we are kicking around to continue to update the hallway. But it is our hope that on your next visit to Pinehurst, you’ll need an extra few minutes to get through the hall.

And for our frequent guests and members, here’s hoping you enjoy a few of the new photos we’ve put up – photos that have never been on the clubhouse walls until now.

Special thanks, as well, to framer Tony Hill and photographer John Gessner.

As for what the photos used to look like, well, here:

50 Arnold Palmer & Harvie Ward 1948 (1200x800)

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We miss you, Payne


October 25th marked the 16th anniversary of the tragic passing of Payne Stewart.

We still miss him. Always will.

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Throwback Thursday: Celebrating Annie Oakley’s time in Pinehurst

Annie Oakley brought sharpshooting to Pinehurst in 1916. (Photo courtesy of Tufts Archives)

“On Friday the 19th Annie Oakley, the world-famous shot, will give one of her old-time exhibitions of trick shooting at the Gun Club. If you have the nerve to stand up to it, she might shoot an apple off the top of your head or shoot the ashes off the tip of your cigarette or shoot a nickel out of your fingers; and for her it is child’s play to smash five flying targets before they can touch the ground.”

These words appeared in the March 17, 1920 issue of the Pinehurst Outlook.

Annie Oakley had already made a name for herself as part of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show when she arrived in Pinehurst in 1916.

Annie Oakley shows how it's done. Photo courtesy of Tufts Archives

Annie Oakley shows how it’s done. (Photo courtesy of Tufts Archives)

After she and husband Frank Butler joined the staff of the Carolina Hotel, she taught shooting lessons and hosted exhibitions. Butler managed the Pinehurst Gun Club.

A trailblazer, Oakley didn’t just teach men how to shoot, she encouraged women to take up the hobby.

“The four thousand or more ladies that have taken lessons in the art of shooting under the guidance of Annie Oakley will be glad to know that she is returning to Pinehurst this season,” wrote the Pinehurst Outlook on Dec. 8, 1917. “As usual, she will give instruction with rifle and pistol at the gun club every afternoon without any charge, and occasional exhibitions of the fancy gun work for which she is famous.”

Oakley is estimated to have helped thousands to nail the bric-a-brac pigeons flying around the gun club every winter through 1922. Her bird dog, Dave, was popular for his act of sniffing out money from exhibition spectators that would later be donated to the Red Cross.

In describing Pinehurst, Butler once wrote, “Haven’t seen any place we like better….”

Local residents will celebrate Oakley’s time in Pinehurst this weekend during the 5th annual Annie Oakley’s Boom Days Festival. The event will be held at the Pinehurst Fair Barn from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday.

It will include shooting demonstrations, a falconer exhibition and more. For more information, click here. Learn more about Oakley’s time in Pinehurst in this month’s issue of Pinehurst Magazine.

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Pinehurst Outlook – Dec. 8, 1917 (Click to enlarge)

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Pinehurst Outlook – March 17, 1920 (Click to enlarge)

 

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