Pinehurst Heritage Archive

How to make Payne Stewart’s famed putt at Pinehurst

There’s a secret to making Payne Stewart’s famed putt to win the 1999 U.S. Open at Pinehurst.

You see, Payne knew something no one else can see.

But Pinehurst’s Willie McRae knows it. So does Eddie Mac.

So do all the Pinehurst caddies.

Want to make Payne’s putt?

Watch the video.

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Robert Dedman’s Rules of Order

The bronze plaque displayed in front of the statue of Robert Dedman Sr. on the Pinehurst Walk of Fame says it all. If we were to put it even more succinctly: Mr. Dedman is most responsible for resurrecting Pinehurst and making it is what it is – again – today.

DedmanPlaque (1280x879)

Click to enlarge

Mr. Dedman wrote a set of rules to live by – and, importantly, to work by as well. Clearly, they would work well for golf, too.

They are Robert’s Rules of Order.

  1. A sense of balance must apply to all areas of your life, not just your livelihood.
  2. It’s so important in life to have a life plan. Planning is a prelude to balance.
  3. The more you learn, the more you earn. Even more importantly, the more you learn, the more you live.
  4. A positive mental attitude is a key ingredient to a balanced, long and happy life.
  5. Humor is one of the best ways to get and keep a positive mental attitude. When times get tough, humor help…even sick humor.
  6. It’s nice to be important, but even more important to be nice.
  7. Setting up “win-win” relationships is the ultimate measure of success in life…and in business.
  8. Be a giver; not a taker. They don’t put luggage racks on hearses for good reason.
  9. Integrity, good health, family and friends are worth more than money can buy.
  10. Don’t forget to have fun. The more fun you have, the more money you make. It works both ways. The more money you make, the more fun you have.

 

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2005 U.S. Open Champion? Nice, but Michael Campbell may have just topped that at Oakmont

You thought Michael Campbell holding off Tiger Woods and winning the 2005 U.S. Open at Pinehurst was impossible?

He may have just topped that. (OK, not really, but still…check it out.)

Campbell, who has retired from golf and is working as a broadcaster for Fox Sports Asia (he’s really good, by the way), recently made an eagle 2 from the fairway of the first hole at Oakmont Country Club.

Only you HAVE to see how he did it:

We were fortunate enough to catch up with Cambo at Merion in 2013, and he was as generous, genuine and kind as he’s always been. We’re proud to have Michael as one of Pinehurst’s greatest champions.

Relive Michael’s great charge and his win over Tiger:

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Two years after history, Pinehurst No. 2 remains a standard in championship golf

After back-to-back U.S. Opens, Pinehurst No. 2 continues as not just a marker of the past, but with an eye toward the future in golf

By LEE PACE

This week the eyes and ears of the golf world have moved from the Sandhills of North Carolina in June 2014 to Pennsylvania. Instead of the whiff of pine in the nostrils of golfers competing in the U.S. Open, they’ll face the harrowing green speeds of Oakmont Country Club.

Two years later, though, the vestiges of the historic back-to-back U.S. Open and Women’s Open at Pinehurst No. 2 are still alive.

Even with Oakmont’s classic Open setup on display the idea of firm-and-fast playing conditions with a tinge of brown has now been established in the minds of golfers, course owners and superintendents nationwide.

The concept of easing back on course setup for the Women’s Open has been seeded after the USGA parsed a wealth of statistics from the performances of the men and women at Pinehurst in 2014.

JUNE: U.S. Open (USGA)

Sunday at the 18th hole of Pinehurst No. 2 during the 2014 U.S. Open. (Photo by the USGA)

And now members and guests at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club enjoy playing No. 2 on a pristine set of new Champion Ultra-Dwarf Bermuda greens that were installed immediately following the Women’s Open last summer and have grown in two years to top-shelf conditions. The greens roll smoothly at 9.5-to-11 on the Stimpmeter and their tendency to play bouncier and prompt pitch-and-run shots to release further than similar shots on the old bent greens adds challenge to the experience—as if it needed any more. … Continue Reading

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The Payne Stewart Putt – In Legos

Payne Stewart @pinehurstresort in 1999. #USOpenChampion #OhMy

A video posted by Jared Jacobs (@goldyeller) on


Remember when @goldyeller – AKA Jared Jacobs – put together the insanely good Tiger Woods video in Legos?

Now, during U.S. Open week, Jacobs has created Payne Stewart’s memorable putt to win the 1999 U.S. Open.

Incredible work.

A few notes of what we at Pinehurst liked best about the Lego video:

:00 seconds Dick Enberg’s call. Just brilliant. That call is so pitch-perfect.

:03 LOOK AT THE FIST PUMP! Jacobs absolutely nails Payne’s famous fist-pump.

:06 The next couple of details are incredibly good. Watch how Lego Mike Hicks – Payne’s Caddie – comes off the ground a little bit when they come together. Hicks had jumped into Payne’s arms, as does Lego Hicks. So good. Even better, though, is how Lego Hicks’ cap moves up slightly after their high-five (also spot-on). That happens for real in 1999 as well.

:09 While Lego Hicks and Lego Payne come together, look at the legs of the figures. You’ll notice Lego Payne is wearing knickers and long white socks.

:13 Check out the expression on Lego Phil Mickelson’s face at first. It’s an even expression, and then Lego Lefty breaks into the sheepish smile. Same as ’99.

Also, note Lego Lefty’s visor. So perfect.

:15 The embrace. Lego Payne and Lego Phil embrace, and you can see them talking. Some don’t know that Phil first said, “I’m so happy for you,” to Payne, and here, you can see Lego Lefty talking. Then Lego Payne cradles Lego Lefty’s face and says, “You’re going to be a father.”

:18 Finally, Lego Payne picks the ball up out of the cup and kisses it. But he also raises the ball and roars, and it’s right on with the audio from the day.

Details matter in these, and Jacobs nails it, right down to the vest Payne made on his way to the first tee that fateful day. Look closely and you’ll see Jacobs has made the edges of the sleeves ragged. Remember, those vests weren’t around in 1999. Payne cut the sleeves off with scissors. And we still have the sleeves and scissors on display here at Pinehurst.

Well done, Jared. Well done.

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